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Some Spices and Herbs: What Goes Best With What Food
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Allspice-Pot roast, fish, eggs, pickles, sweet potatoes, squash and fruit.


Basil-Tomatoes, noodles, rice, beef stew, pork, meat loaf, duck, fish, veal, green or vegetable salad, eggplant, potatoes, carrots, spinach, peas, eggs, cheese and jelly.


Cayenne pepper-Pickles, vegetables, cheese, eggs, fish, chicken, pizza, spaghetti and meat dishes.


Chili powder-Eggplant, corn, bean casseroles, chili (of course!), cheese, marinades for meat, chicken, meat loaf, stews, egg dishes, dips, tomato or BBQ sauces.


Cinnamon-Beverages, bakery products, fruits, pickles, pork, ham, lamb or beef stews, roast lamb and chicken.


Garlic-Tomato dishes, soups, dips, sauces, salads, salad dressings, dill pickles, meat, poultry, fish, stews, marinades and bread.


Ginger-Asian dishes, soups, beverages, fish, poultry, veal, pork, lamb, beef, baked products, vegetables, baked or stewed fruits, conserves and pickles.


Nutmeg-Conserves, pickles, vegetables, eggs, seafood, chicken, fruits, baked products, puddings and hot beverages.


Onion powder-Dips, soups, stews, all meats, fish, poultry, salads, vegetables, stuffing, cheese dishes, egg dishes, breads and rice dishes. Using Onion salt? Reduce the amount of salt in the recipe.


Oregano-Tomatoes, pasta sauces, pizza, chili con carne, BBQ sauce, vegetable soup, egg and cheese dishes, onions, stuffing, pork, lamb, chicken and fish.


Paprika-Pickles, vegetables with no color, cheese dishes, egg dishes, poultry, fish, game, sausage, lamb, veal, pork and beef.


Red Pepper-BBQ’d beef and pork, tamale pie, dips, curried dishes, spaghetti sauce, vegetables, poultry, pickles, sauces, cheese dishes, soups and meat.


Rosemary-Lamb, poultry, veal, beef, pork, fish, soups, stews, marinades, potatoes, cauliflower, spinach, mushrooms, turnips, fruits and breads.

Sage-Potatoes, cheese, tomatoes, eggplant, onions, lima beans, marinades, veal, pork, beef, fish, poultry, chowders, soups, sauces, stuffings for poultry, fish and other meats.

Thyme-Vegetables, fish, poultry and meat.

Vanilla-Baked goods, beverages and puddings.

Additional Info

Spices are the parts of plants, like the dried seeds, buds, fruit or flower and plant bark or roots; they’re usually of tropical origin.

 Herbs are from the leafy parts.

Spices can be sold in whole or ground form. Both spices and herbs should be stored in a cool, dry place in air-tight containers; always tightly close the container after each use. Under favorable conditions, spices will keep for up to 6 months; whole spices will keep almost indefinitely.

Herbs will lose flavor more rapidly (than ground pepper, ginger, cloves and cinnamon). But if properly stored, they’ll keep for several months.

Ground spices can be added about 15 minutes before the end of the cooking process; whole spices are best in slow-cooking dishes (like stew), so they can be added at the beginning of the cooking process.

Source: “United States Department of Agriculture-“Seasoning With Spices And Herbs” Fact Sheet-December 1978

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